Perfecto Creek Perfection Near Gunnison, Colorado


Perfection is a road, not a destination.”

Late July 2016 near Gunnison, Colorado

I am always on the lookout for a backcountry creek, preferably in a remote canyon or wilderness area, featuring great scenery, abundant wildflowers, and eager trout.  I love that feeling of discovering an untrammeled piece of our planet Earth or at least one that is very lightly trodden.

I have had my eye on a little stream called Perfecto Creek and its partner Chavez Creek since last summer when I crossed over them to fish the headwaters of Cochetopa Creek high in the La Garita Wilderness imageArea south of Gunnison, Colorado. With a name like Perfecto, imagehow can one resist??  Where the gravel U.S. Forest Service road crosses over, it’s barely a rivulet, but I spied some big inviting beaver ponds not too far below.  And with some topographical map and GIS sleuthing, I find that just a mile down downstream Perfecto is joined by Chavez Creek then paired up they descend into a canyon on the way to a rendezvous with Pauline Creek (See my article on Pauline Creek from 2015.).  That may mean enough water to float some decent-sized trout.

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Day 3 of Three Perfect Days On Cochetopa Creek

August 22, 2015

“Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.  Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into the trees.  The winds will blow their own freshness into you and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like the autumn leaves.”  John Muir

Day 3:  Today I sleep late to recuperate from Day Two’s long hours on the water, the two mile hike back to the SUV, then the hour-long 4WD trek to camp.  With plenty of good winks, I am ready to explore some new water, and as things start to warm up around 9 a.m., head out to the headwaters of Cochetopa Creek high in the La Garita Wilderness area.  It’s about an hour’s drive on Forest Service 794, a wash-boardy, circuitous gravel road that ends at the boundary of the wilderness area.

Enroute, I cross over a handful of alluring little creeks—Pauline (hardly a trickle, but I’ll fish it downstream tomorrow and have a great day—see the entry entitled “The Pleasures of Pauline.”), Perfecto (aptly named, pristine and sprinkled with good-looking beaver ponds), and Nutra (more beaver ponds).  It’s a challenge not to stop and sample.  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI am surprised to see a sign saying I am on an old 1874 toll stage route that navigated over the jagged peaks of the Continental Divide to the gold mines in the remote San Juan Mountains miles and miles to the west.  Just when I think I am quite the adventurer, I see a prompt like this that reminds me of what hearty, tough souls those trail-blazers were.  It’s hard to comprehend how they built this road hundreds of miles by hand with mules and horses over this rough terrain.  It was supposed to become a rail line, but was eclipsed by other equally daunting routes to the north and south.

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Day 2–Three Perfect Days On Cochetopa Creek

August 21, 2015

Day 2:  After a relaxing, easy day of fishing yesterday and a good night’s sleepCO Trail, I’m rearin’ to explore the more remote middle section of Cochetopa Creek.  I haven’t been up there for a couple of years.  Over five miles of beautiful, meandering meadow waters are bracketed by two steep canyons above and below that make access a challenge.  The hearty angler can hike in on the Colorado Trail or four-wheel in on one of the rough access roads, then walk to the good water.  A detailed topo/trails map is a must before venturing into this backcountry—the National Geographic Trails Map #139 LaGarita/Cochetopa Hills is a good place to start plotting your trip.

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Three Perfect Days On Cochetopa Creek–Day One

Dome Lake
Dome Lake

August 20, 2015

Day One:  I’m in my little travel trailer a.k.a mobile fishing camp parked next to Dome Lake located in a high country state park near the Continental Divide, not too far from Gunnison, Colorado.  I drove up early this morning, sorely in need of a multi-day injection of nature and zen trout fishing time on one of my favorite waters—Cochetopa Creek.  It’s mid-August, the rain has finally stopped, and the streams are clearing and fishable.

Cochetopa CreekMaybe 15 feet at its widest, Cochetopa Creek arises at the foot of an imposing 14,000 foot+ mountain, San Luis Peak, in the La Garita Wilderness area south of Gunnison.  Miles below, the creek squeezes out of a canyon stretch into a vast open sagebrush and grass valley called Cochetopa Park.  There it meanders for a good 10 miles with gentle runs and S-curves before plunging into another canyon and joining Tomichi Creek which flows into the big Gunnison River, a fabled trout water.  Cochetopa Creek is loaded with healthy, eager fish and steeped in history.  In other words, my kinda place!

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