Furor On The Faka Union: Tales Of Big Snook, Irma, And Wildfires

It’s barely 50 degrees—frigid for South Florida–as I load up my yak and push off at 8:00 a.m. for a day of snook fishing on the Faka Union River, one of my favorite Everglades upcountry waters.

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Riding a falling tide, I glide through a tight mangrove tunnel for 30 minutes and finally emerge into the first shallow lake.  Belying the weatherman’s prediction of calm winds, there’s a stiff breeze blowing out of the north, and my usual honey hole, where I caught a couple of dozen snook only a few weeks ago, fails to produce.  I valiantly try to take a video, but almost get blown off the water.  I pedal on dejectedly.  I manage a few smaller snook in the next lake and connecting creek but it’s beginning to look like an ecotour rather than the epic fishing day I had hoped for.

Then I hit what I call snook flats, a nondescript stretch offshore of a mangrove-studded shoreline further downstream that produced a couple of 25” plus snook back in February.  It may be my last hope.  This trip the snook seemed to be ignoring my usual redoubtable white Gulp curlytail, so I switch to a gold DOA paddletail.  The old veteran anglers down here swear gold is the ticket for big snook.

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The Dynamic Duo–White Gulp Curlytail and Gold DOA Paddletail With 1/8th Oz Jig Head

I pitch a long cast out in front of the kayak and start to crank it back.  Something big swirls and my rod nearly jumps from my hands….a big snook erupts from the surface and a furious fight is on.

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Go For More On Canoe Route #4 Near Port of The Islands, FL

For more on backcountry creek fishing around Everglades City, see my Florida Sportsman article:  FloridaSportsman Backcountry Creek Ways

April 2015

One of the least-visited, but most productive kayak fishing routes in the region is just a stone’s throw from Port of the Island and the Tamiami Trail–but deep in the heart of the Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge.  I’ve never encountered another angler on this trip, even though I rate it as having the best potential for a big snook or red of any I have sampled hereabouts.  It begins inauspiciously in a little road-side lagoon off the Tamiami Trail on what’s marked as Canoe Route #4 by the Ten Thousand Island National Wildlife Refuge folk, then follows a narrow, shallow little creek snaking its way south through a tight corridor of sawgrass into a pristine, hidden wilderness.

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In stark contrast to the Port of the Islands and its sister Golden Gates Estates developments to the east, poster children for environmentally rapacious Florida-style real estate projects of the 1970s, this route wanders through a beautiful untouched haven for egrets, spoonbills, ducks, and my favorite Florida bird, the graceful swallow-tailed kite.  The channels it follows and shallow ponds it flows through are loaded with mullet and other bait fish, attracting snook and reds that grow fat on the bounty.  Tarpon, bass, cichlids, jacks, and snapper also are on the menu for anglers who probe the water carefully.

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Swallow-Tailed Kite

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The Piscatorial Facts Of The Faka Union River

(Note:  See my April 2018 article for an update on fishing the Faka Union River.)

The Faka Union River, known as the Fiki Uni to some long-time locals, is an important fixture of one of the largest pristine areas in Florida—the Fakahatchee Strand.  It is the retreat of flocks of wading birds, deer, black bears, and the endangered Florida Panther.  You may even see, as I did, an endangered American crocodile in this wilderness that has

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AMERICAN CROCODILE WITH TELLTALE STRIPING, NARROW SNOUT, AND PROTRUDING TEETH

been designated by Florida as an Area of Critical State Concern.  And the chances for a coveted angler’s slam–snook, redfish, and tarpon–are as good here as anywhere in the country.  I’ve scored several over the past few years.  You may even hook a hungry bull or black tip shark to boot.

Although not apparent on the surface, the environment here has been severely altered by get-rich-quick development and drainage schemes over the past 50 years.  Only in the past decade have serious remedial efforts been undertaken.  The Port of the Islands development, the aborted Southern Golden Gates Estate project, and Faka Union Canal just up the road barely a mile from the put-in are poster children for the carnage.

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